Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State Local and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies U.S. Department of Justice

ISBN:

Published: March 5th 2014

Kindle Edition

260 pages


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Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State Local and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies  by  U.S. Department of Justice

Law Enforcement Intelligence: A Guide for State Local and Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies by U.S. Department of Justice
March 5th 2014 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 260 pages | ISBN: | 8.31 Mb

Every law enforcement agency in the United States, regardless of agency size, must have the capacity to understand the implications of information collection, analysis, and intelligence sharing. Each agency must have an organized mechanism to receiveMoreEvery law enforcement agency in the United States, regardless of agency size, must have the capacity to understand the implications of information collection, analysis, and intelligence sharing. Each agency must have an organized mechanism to receive and manage intelligence as well as a mechanism to report and share critical information with other law enforcement agencies.

In addition, it is essential that law enforcement agencies develop lines of communication and information-sharing protocols with the private sector, particularly those related to the critical infrastructure, as well as with those private entities that are potential targets of terrorists and criminal enterprises.Not every agency has the staff or resources to create a formal intelligence unit, nor is it necessary in smaller agencies.

Even without an intelligence unit, a law enforcement organization must have the ability to effectively consume the information and intelligence products being shared by a wide range of organizations at all levels of government. State, local, and tribal law enforcement (SLTLE) will be its most effective when a single source in every agency is the conduit of critical information, whether it is the Terrorist Intelligence Unit of the Los Angeles Police Department, the sole intelligence analyst of the Lansing, Michigan Police Department, or the patrol sergeant who understands the language of intelligence and is the information sharing contact point in the Mercedes, Texas Police Department.

Hence, each law enforcement agency must have an understanding of its intelligence management capabilities regardless of its size or organizational structure.This document will provide common language and processes to develop and employ an intelligence capacity in SLTLE agencies across the United States as well as articulate a uniform understanding of concepts, issues, and terminology for law enforcement intelligence (LEI). While terrorism issues are currently most pervasive in the current discussion of LEI, the principles of intelligence discussed in this document apply beyond terrorism and include organized crime and entrepreneurial crime of all forms.

Drug trafficking and the associated crime of money laundering, for example, continue to be a significant challenge for law enforcement. Transnational computer crime, particularly Internet fraud, identity theft cartels, and global black marketeering of stolen and counterfeit goods, are entrepreneurial crime problems that are increasingly being relegated to SLTLE agencies to investigate simply because of the volume of criminal incidents. Similarly, local law enforcement is being increasingly drawn into human trafficking and illegal immigration enterprises and the often associated crimes related to counterfeiting of official documents, such as passports, visas, drivers licenses, Social Security cards, and credit cards.

Even the trafficking of arts and antiquities has increased, often bringing a new profile of criminal into the realm of entrepreneurial crime. All require an intelligence capacity for SLTLE, as does the continuation of historical organized crime activities such as auto theft, cargo theft, and virtually any other scheme that can produce profit for an organized criminal entity.To be effective, the law enforcement community must interpret intelligence-related language in a consistent manner. In addition, common standards, policies, and practices will help expedite intelligence sharing while at the same time protecting the privacy of citizens and preserving hard- on community policing relationships.



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